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Status of Wailea 670/Honua’ula August 2015

The developer of the proposed 1150 unit housing and 100,000 sq. ft commercial development on 670 acres adjoining Maui Meadows has informed state and federal wildlife biologists and State Historic Preservation Office that a 130 acre preserve will be created in the southern portion of the land to protect rare and endangered flora and fauna and thousands of archaeological sites.

Additional areas will also be left undeveloped along natural gulches, totaling over another 100 acres.

Maui Tomorrow volunteers, working with native Hawaiian group, Maui Cultural Lands, have been monitoring populations or endangered awikiwiki plants on the property, and have recorded several new populations over the past few rainier years.

Maui Tomorrow ally, Sierra Club Maui, challenged the project’s Environmental Impact Statement in 2013, and the project is on hold while settlement negotiations are finalized in that challenge.

If a settlement is finalized, the project will be free to move forward to complete its Phase II Project District approval at Maui Planning Commission.

This is the last review of the proposed development where public input is involved.

250 units of the Wailea 670/ Honua’ula affordable housing is required to be offsite on land that was once part of the proposed Piilani Promenade (“Kihei Mega Mall”) development which Maui Tomorrow has challenged.

Maui Tomorrow is asking that the entire 88 acre site where the Wailea 670 affordable housing and “Mega Mall” commercial development is proposed follow the conditions set during its 1995 Land Use Commission (LUC) approval. That matter is still before the LUC.

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Rare Wailea 670 Plants part of Settlement

Rare Wailea 670 Plants part of Landmark Legal Settlement Protection under Endangered Species Act

Over 70 native Hawaiian species will get EPA staff review and decision-making over next two years.

On July 12, 2011, the Center for Biological Diversity struck a historic legal settlement with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, requiring the agency to make initial or final decisions on whether to add hundreds of imperiled plants and animals to the endangered species by 2018. Continue reading